Parker Millsap

The Burl Presents

Parker Millsap

Joshua Hedley

Sun · June 24, 2018

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$15.00 - $18.00

This event is 18 and over

Questions or want to rent the owners booth? email info@theburlky.com

Full Band show. 

Parker Millsap
Parker Millsap
At only 24 years of age, Oklahoma native Parker Millsap is quickly making a name for himself with his captivating live performances, soulful sound, and character-driven narratives. He recently wrapped up a banner year, which included his network television debut on CONAN, an invitation to play with Elton John at the Apple Music Festival, an Austin City Limits taping and an Americana Music Association nomination for Album of the Year, as well as winning the International Folk Music Awards' Artist Of the Year. Parker's most recent release, The Very Last Day, has received praise from The New York Times, The Boston Globe, LA Times, Austin Chronicle and Rolling Stone to name a few.

Parker grew up in the tiny town of Purcell, OK (pop. 5,952) where he attended a Pentecostal church with his family three times a week for most of his youth. Though Parker doesn't consider himself very religious these days, the experiences engraved upon him inform his songwriting. Blending that fire and brimstone preaching with rock, country, blues and Waits-ian imagery, he has created a sound uniquely his own.

Parker first picked up an acoustic guitar at nine, then plugged in and went electric after getting into Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan, eventually starting a cover band, Fever in Blue, with classmate Michael Rose who still plays bass with him today. After graduating high school, he moved to Northern California, where he interned at Prairie Sun Recording, the studio where Tom Waits recorded Bone Machine and Mule Variations. Returning to Oklahoma, he put down the electric guitar and got into songwriting, releasing an indie album in 2012, Palisade, which he sold from the back of his van.

A trip to Nashville found Parker playing at the Tin Pan South songwriter's festival, where his performance impressed Old Crow Medicine Show's manager so much that he invited Parker to open a string of dates for the band, later leading to a slot on their New Year's Eve gig at the Ryman Auditorium. Parker has also opened dates for Jason Isbell, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Lake Street Dive, Lucinda Williams and Shovels & Rope.

“I like to set goals for myself that are impossible to reach,” he explains. “That way, I always have something to aim for, a better song, different characters, new stories. I just want to pay the bills and feed my dog, and maybe buy a new guitar every now and then. That’s all I need. I don’t want to be Elvis Presley, but I wouldn’t complain if a million girls screamed for me, either. Just don’t tell my girlfriend that.” Parker Millsap is ready to share his Oklahoma roots with the rest of the country, and, hopefully, the world
Joshua Hedley
Joshua Hedley
With the release of his highly anticipated debut album Mr. Jukebox via Third Man Records, Joshua Hedley will embrace the role he was born to play: this generation’s classic country champion. An accomplished fiddle player, Hedley felt inexplicably drawn toward the instrument as a child. Hegothis hands on his own fiddle at age 8,andby 12, he was playing with middle-aged pickers at the VFW. At 19,he moved from his native Florida to Nashville, where he became anin-demand sideman atRobert’s Western World and other bars, and ultimately, a well-respected frontman. Armed with aneasy croon and prodigious fiddle playing, he became known as the Mayor of Lower Broad. He hit the road to perform with artists including Jonny Fritz, Justin Townes Earle, and more, while the 2015 documentary Heartworn Highways Revisited featured Hedley prominently. Hedley didn’t start writing his own songs until he was about28 years-old. So on the backend of his 20s, he finally started writing, eventually unlocking a flood of clarity and creativity. The heartbreaking, distilled, defiantly classic country that poured outof him became Mr. Jukebox, a salve and beacon for 60s honky-tonk devotees everywhere. Album opener“Counting All My Tears” carves out the collection’s gloriously tear-jerking territory from the jump. As“oooooohhhs”and“aaaaahhhs” serve as spine-tingling harmonies––a classic-country flourish carried throughout Mr. Jukebox––lonely piano is joined by a familiar cast including steel andof course, fiddle. “Mr. Jukebox”is a swinging nodto those beloved machines––both inanimate andbreathing––that dependably play a lot of songs for a little money. It’s impossible to listen to the tune andnot smile thinking of Hedley’s years logged in cover bandson Nashville’s Lower Broad. Lush strings kick off the sauntering “Weird Thought Thinker,” which features harmonies that evoke both bass walkdowns and angels. An ace fiddle intro opens“Let Them Talk,” a carefree odeto being inlove and not worrying about who knows it. “Let’s Take a Vacation” pleads for one last lovers’ getaway to try to remember what’s been lost. Hedley delivers a masterful recitation over crying steel, soft harmonies, and rich supporting strings. He penned shuffling “These Walls”about FooBar, a beloved East Nashville dive Hedley lived near before it shut down. “This Time” paints a vivid picture of leaving that’s both proud and blue. Simple and brilliant, “I Never Shed a Tear” sounds like a standard, but just like all but one track onMr. Jukebox, it’s a Hedley original. “You’re trying to say as much as you can inas few words as possible,”he says. “Trying toconvey an emotion tomake people feel their own emotions.” Hedley’s ability to capture feelings isonspellbinding display in album standout “Don’t Waste Your Tears,” a soaring, gut-punching vocal performance. The final track is the only cover: a goosebumps-inducing version of“When You Wish Upon a Star.” Hedley picked the song to honor his dad, who passed away about three years agowithout seeing the record deal, glowing press, and peer admiration Hedley’s earned. “We spent a lot of Christmases at Disney World,”he says. “When I was searching for a cover song, it dawned onmethat mydad didn’t getto see anyof this happen, buthe always wanted it.”When asked what he hopes listeners get outofMr. Jukebox, Hedley doesn’t hesitate. “I just want people to remember they have feelings, and that they’re valid,”he says. “Not everything is Coors Light and tailgates. There are other aspects of life that aren’t so great that people experience. They’repart of life, part of what shapes people. And that’s worth noting.